LEVELING THE PLAYING FIELD FOR METRO MANILA’S IMPOVERISHED HOUSEHOLDS

Torio C, P.(2018). Leveling the playing field for metro Manila’s impoverished households. Water Policy 20(3)

Abstract

Metro Manila’s water privatization is one of the world’s largest and longest-running privatization programs for a water utility. While traditional efficiency metrics show significantly improved service levels under this schema, local anti-privatization activists maintain that the program does not benefit the urban poor. Assessments from an equity lens offer a fresh perspective, using information from a consumer survey of 53,733 residential households, privatization reports, and field interviews. Results show that access and affordability remain critical concerns for impoverished urban households despite major service improvements. Philippine policy makers must address these twin concerns in order to ensure a level playing field for these vulnerable households.

 

WATER, EQUITY AND RESILIENCE IN SOUTHERN AFRICA: FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

Rodina, L., Baker, L.A., Galvin, M., Golden, J., Harris, L.M., Manungfala, T., Musemwa, M., Sutherland, C., & G. Ziervogel (2017). Water, equity and resilience in Southern Africa: future directions for research and practiceCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 26-27: 143-151. Preprint PDF of the article here.

Advancing methods for research on household water insecurity: Studying entitlements and capabilities, socio-cultural dynamics, and political processes, institutions and governance

Amber Wutich, Jessica Budds, Laura Eichelberger, Jo Geere, Leila M. Harris, Jennifer A. Horney, Wendy Jepson, Emma Norman, Kathleen O’Reilly, Amber L. Pearson, Sameer H. Shah, Jamie Shinn, Karen Simpson, Chad Staddon, Justin Stoler, Manuel P. Teodoro, Sera L. Young. (2017). Advancing methods for research on household water insecurity: Studying entitlements and capabilities, socio-cultural dynamics, and political processes, institutions and governance. Water Security, 2. 

Highlights

• Existing approaches have advantages, but underestimate household water insecurity
• HWI methods must address economic, socio-cultural, and political processes
• Hard-to-measure dimensions of HWI can be assessed with methods we present